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Source global Wall Street Journal     time 2020-09-07 00:02:37
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5 best things our food writers ate in the Twin Cities this week

5 best things our food writers ate in the Twin Cities this week

Here's a measure of the doughnuts' appeal: "They once may or may not have gotten me out of a speeding ticket," Crowell said with a laugh. While hauling 20 dozen of them from the orchard to her Grand Avenue shop, her fast moving vehicle caught the attention of a squad car. "He asked me why I was speeding, and I told him I had to get these doughnuts to the store," she said. Ever the marketer, she offered him a doughnut, and he replied by sharing a few words on the perils of speeding. Not a bad trade off.

Agelgil opened in a former coffee shop two years ago. Cherinat and her business partner Konjit Kidane worked for six months with no staff to save enough to buy the building and renovate the kitchen when they had the opportunity. They applied for business loans and were rejected repeatedly. Then they linked up with Community Reinvestment Fund, USA, a Twin Cities based nonprofit that addresses social and economic inequality, and has invested in 180 restaurants nationwide, many of which are owned by immigrants and people of color. Agelgil's owners secured the small business loan through CRF, in partnership with RBC Global Asset Management.

Here's a measure of the doughnuts' appeal: "They once may or may not have gotten me out of a speeding ticket," Crowell said with a laugh. While hauling 20 dozen of them from the orchard to her Grand Avenue shop, her fast moving vehicle caught the attention of a squad car. "He asked me why I was speeding, and I told him I had to get these doughnuts to the store," she said. Ever the marketer, she offered him a doughnut, and he replied by sharing a few words on the perils of speeding. Not a bad trade off.

Here's a measure of the doughnuts' appeal: "They once may or may not have gotten me out of a speeding ticket," Crowell said with a laugh. While hauling 20 dozen of them from the orchard to her Grand Avenue shop, her fast moving vehicle caught the attention of a squad car. "He asked me why I was speeding, and I told him I had to get these doughnuts to the store," she said. Ever the marketer, she offered him a doughnut, and he replied by sharing a few words on the perils of speeding. Not a bad trade off.

Agelgil opened in a former coffee shop two years ago. Cherinat and her business partner Konjit Kidane worked for six months with no staff to save enough to buy the building and renovate the kitchen when they had the opportunity. They applied for business loans and were rejected repeatedly. Then they linked up with Community Reinvestment Fund, USA, a Twin Cities based nonprofit that addresses social and economic inequality, and has invested in 180 restaurants nationwide, many of which are owned by immigrants and people of color. Agelgil's owners secured the small business loan through CRF, in partnership with RBC Global Asset Management.


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